• 23 Mar 2021 8:14 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)


    Antidesma erostre Wild Currant


    This bushy shrub makes a very decorative screen and the contrast between the dark green shiny leaves and the red panicles of fruit is simply stunning. Small inconspicuous flowers produce clusters of edible sweet red/black berries twice a year. Antidesma originates in the upland rainforests of north Queensland and is slow growing at first, but once established can reach to 3m tall with a 2m spread. Formative pruning will produce a very attractive hardy hedge, tolerant of sun or shade - a great productive addition to any garden.

    For low-priced native plants and expert advice come along to our Spring Native Plants Market -click here to sign up for event updates.


  • 10 Mar 2021 8:22 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)


    We often think of many native plants as being 'bird attracting', but many flowers are valuable for bringing beneficial insects, such as stingless bees or honey bees, to the garden.

    For example, the Samford Holly (Graptophyllum spinigerum) has small white flowers that may look rather insignificant to the human eye, but they are a magnet for a multitude of beneficial insects. Blue-banded bees love them, as do carpenter bees, which may vigorously defend a plant from interlopers.

    For low-priced native plants and expert advice come along to our Spring Native Plants Marketclick here to sign up for event updates.


  • 7 Mar 2021 8:20 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)


    Artanema fimbriatum Koala Bells


    Many plants are too large for most suburban gardens but if one looks around there are many small gems that will fit. Artanema fimbriatum, which is also known as ‘Koala Bells’ is a local plant that is suitable for growing in the ground or in a pot. The plants grow to about 500mm in height; have soft green leaves and 30mm long bell-like flowers which are usually blue but there are also pink forms.

    Because they occur in moist environments they grow best in semi-shaded, moist sites, but due to their small size they are very easy to grow in containers, where they are usually smaller and have the advantage of being conveniently placed where you want them.

    After a flowering flush they can be pruned back so that you and the Blue-banded Bees can enjoy them from spring to autumn.

    For low-priced native plants and expert advice come along to our Spring Native Plants Market - click here to sign up for event updates.

  • 7 Mar 2021 3:13 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)


    Xerochrysum bracteatum - Golden Everlasting Daisy


    Xerochrysum bracteatum, the "Golden Everlasting", is one of the best known of the "paper daisies" as it is a very widespread species occurring in both annual and perennial forms. It varies in habit from prostrate to a shrubby plant of about 1m in height. The leaves are usually large (up to 100mm long) and green to grey-green in colour.

    The individual flowers are very small but are formed into a large cluster surrounded by large papery bracts. The overall appearance is that of a large, single "flower" with the bracts as the "petals". However, well over a hundred true flowers occur inside the ring of bracts.

    Golden everlasting responds well to annual fertilising, usually with a slow-release type and appreciates an assured water supply. Perennial forms are usually quick growing in a sunny, well drained position. They benefit from a regular light pruning to encourage branching and a greater number of flowers. Severe pruning to overcome "legginess" may be successful but only as a last resort.

    Peter is a master at producing flowering Xerochrysum for the various NPQ Plants Markets and always has a good selection of specimens to choose from at his stall/

    For low-priced native plants and expert advice come along to our Spring Native Plants Market click here to sign up for event updates.

  • 6 Mar 2021 8:30 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Stylidium graminifolium Grass Trigger Plant


    A beautiful little tufted grass leaf-like plant with flowers having a unique trigger mechanism for depositing pollen on a visiting insect.

    Ideal as a feature pot plant and a great talking point. They are known as 'trigger plants' because of the unique, sensitive flower column which is triggered by insect visitors.

    The trigger remains cocked until an insect probes the flower and then springs upwards and deposits pollen on the head or back of the insect which then transfers the pollen to another flower.

    Why not see what other unique small treasures Michelle, Grower #50, has for you while you browse around the Autumn Plants Market.

    For low-priced native plants and expert advice come along to our Autumn Native Plants Market on Saturday 24 April, 9am-3pm in Samford Valley, Brisbane. We'll be at 'The Barn', 38 Showgrounds Drive, Highvale.
    Get email updates (including a list of plants ahead of time)—click here to sign up.



  • 4 Mar 2021 9:03 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)


    Zieria verrucosa Warty Zieria


    Are you familiar with the native plant Genus – Zieria? These are shrubs in the RUTACEAE family, also referred to as sandfly bushes. They are generally small to medium sized shrubs which can be quite long-lived. I have a Zieria that has received little attention and it is 15 years old now. Over 36 species occur in Queensland with at least 11 of these being Rare and Threatened.

    Most have white or pink 4-petalled flowers which are not very large but are produced in profusion. Zieria plants contain essential oils such as safrole which has insect-repelling properties – crush the leaves and smell. Given a well-lit position and well-drained soil, they are easy to grow and respond well to a light prune occasionally.

    Enthusiasts attending the Autumn Plants Market found the following species on the Grower #25 stall: Zieria collina and Z. verrucosa (classified as Vulnerable), Z. exsul and Z. bifida (classified as Endangered) and Z. vagans, Z. scopulus and Z. furfuracea subsp. gymnocarpa (classified as Critically Endangered). One lucky person even brought a Zieria that may be as yet an unnamed species from Springbrook!

    For low-priced native plants and expert advice come along to our Spring Native Plants Market click here to sign up for event updates.


  • 2 Mar 2021 8:09 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)


    Wikstroemia indica -Bootlace bark or Tie bush


    This small twiggy little shrub is one of my favourite plants. There seem to be two different forms – one is coastal and the other grows on rainforest margins and moist eucalypt forests. The form I grow is the coastal one. It has small greenish-yellow tubular flowers and round, bright red fruits. The leaves are oval-shaped, dark green above and bluish green below. The fibrous bark can be pulled off in long strips, giving the plant its common name.

    Grows to 1.5 metres tall but generally smaller in cultivation. It grows in sun or shade and is tough enough to withstand periods of dryness. With regular pruning it can be trained into a decorative low evergreen hedge.

    For low-priced native plants and expert advice come along to our Spring Native Plants Market click here to sign up for event updates.

  • 1 Mar 2021 9:15 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)


    Pavetta australiensis - Butterfly Bush


    A tall shrub, usually to 3-4m but can grow taller in ideal conditions. Great understory plant for part shade to light dappled shade. It needs regular watering while establishing and will tolerate dry periods when mature. However if it is a prolonged dry period it will drop a majority of its leaves.

    Clusters of perfumed white flowers appear spring and early summer, but can also be triggered by late summer and autumn rains. The flowers are attractive to several species of butterflies as a source of nectar. These are followed by small round black fruits which are attractive to a variety of birds.

    Pavetta will take to some pruning and has potential as an ornamental, informal hedge.

    For low-priced native plants and expert advice come along to our Spring Native Plants Market click here to sign up for event updates.


  • 1 Mar 2021 4:13 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)


    Eupomatia laurina - Bolwarra or Native Guava


    For the gardener with a cool, moist and shady garden area under some taller trees and shrubs wanting to source plants to provide attractive understorey, Bolwarra (Eupomatia laurina) is hard to beat. The shrub’s multi-branched, arching habit and large glossy leaves give a lush rainforest look and it can easily be pruned to control height and maintain bushiness.

    The highly perfumed flowers open in summer early in the morning and in winter, if fertilized by its pollinator, a weevil, will form into fruit containing the seeds in a sweet edible pulp, hence an alternate common name, Native Guava. Bolwarra is an ancient primitive plant found in well-developed rainforest from northern Queensland to Victoria, and at sea level to 1200m, which adapts well to cultivation in home gardens.

    For low-priced native plants and expert advice come along to our Spring Native Plants Marketclick here to sign up for event updates.


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